How to Swing a Golf Club (A HOW TO GOLF SWING VIDEO GUIDE OF THE GOLF SWING BASICS AND MECHANICS)

Ladies and Gentlemen, there is not only one way to play golf. There is not only one way how to swing a golf club. There is not only one way to swing a golf driver. If there was only one proper or ideal golf swing motion or golf swing plane, Jim Furyk, Lee Trevino, Bubba Watson, and Raymond Floyd should just give back all the money and trophies they have won on Tour. However, they all have one thing in common. They have mastered their natural golf swing strengths. Understanding their are different golf swings and experimenting gave these golfers the ability to master the golf swing basics, fundamentals of the golf swing, and mechanics of a golf swing that fit their natural abilities.

Every player has a swing DNA. Some of us are right handed and some of us left handed. Some ladies golf swings are the same or better than men’s golf swings. Everyone has a different body type, level of flexibility, and natural athleticism we are all given at birth. Your potential to be a excellent golfer is much higher if you find proper golf swing mechanics that best suit the strengths of your god given abilities. With the success of players with very different swing types like Ben Hogan and Jack Nicklaus, my mentor Jim Hardy realized that there was not just one way to swing a golf club. Hogan did not swing like Nicklaus, yet both were extremely successful and considered two of the all time greats.

One of the most important things I have ever learned was when Jim Hardy taught me that best way to swing a golf club starts with choosing either a one or two plane golf swing technique. After you make that choice, work only on the elements that are relative to the model golf swing you choose. Golf swing improvement can be very fast. Just ask Matt Kuchar. The best swing in golf is a consistent golf swing that creates a correct impact of the golf ball. The way the swing looks is not important so long as the impact is correct and repeatable.

Master the golf swing basics and the proper golf swing technique for the one or two plane swing type and you are well on your play better golf. Keep reading and we will have the golf swing explained in ways you likely have never heard before.

Ladies and Gentlemen, let’s fix your golf swing. Let’s get started in this golf swing guide with the golf swing basics and learn how to swing a golf club step by step.

The Golf Swing Basics

So, how do you swing a golf club properly? What are the fundamentals of golf? What are the golf swing basics? How to swing a golf club correctly? As you go through the article, I will answer these questions and show you some great golf instruction videos demonstrating the correct movements and some of the golf swing secrets of the 1 and 2 plane golf swings.

Here is list of basic golf information that I think every golfer should know about swinging a golf club correctly. We all want a new golf swing made easy. Let’s get started on what we will cover to try and make the golf swing steps easier for you:

What is a One Plane or Two Plane Golf Swing?

After a conversation with legendary golf instructor John Jacobs about Ben Hogan in 1977, Jim figured out that all basic golf swing methods, no matter how much they appeared to be different golf swings, basically fell into one of two categories. With the basic golf swing, either you swing your arms somewhat on the same plane as you turn your body, or you don’t. If your arms swing up and around your body from address on approximately the same plane as your shoulders turn, Jim referred to that as a “One Plane” golf technique. Hogan referred to this as a single plane golf swing. If your arms swing up more vertically from address, not in the same plane as your shoulders turn, but on a steeper plane, Jim referred to this as a “Two Plane” golf technique. 

With this knowledge Jim Hardy went down a path that lasted nine years in which he tried to figure out exactly what Ben Hogan did in his full golf swing. In these 9 years, Jim Hardy carefully crafted the one and two plane golf swings and carefully tested all of the elements that make each one their own to confirm his methods.

Let me start by introducing the step by step golf swings in basic detail so you can fully appreciate Jim’s findings on what the one plane and two plane concepts are all about.

Golf Swing Mechanics

One Plane Swing (Left) Two Plane Swing (Right) Photos by J.D. Cuban and Jim Luft of Golf Digest

One Plane Golf Swing Overview

Here is a swing breakdown for the one plane swing. For the one plane swing you will need to bend over and have an angle in your spine that allows your shoulders to be somewhat pointed towards the ground. In the back swing, you are going to swing your arms around your torso. Your right arm will go up and behind your shoulder and your left arm will end up pinned to your chest. You are going to turn on a steep angle with the shoulders. In your transition to your downswing, the left arm will not be pointing out towards the ball, the right forearm will point towards the ball. The left arm is pointing straight down and moving inward because of the plane of the golf swing. During the golf swing follow through, the club head will be moving around and below the shoulders until completed. The one plane swing is a flat golf swing.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credit: Plane Truth Golf

The one plane golf swing is a shallow natural golf swing and will help you to be more effective with your wedges and driver but not as productive with fairway woods and long irons.  You see so many hybrid 3 and 4 irons on tour and at your local golf course because of the popularity of the one plane golf swing.

The typical mishits you will see with the 1 plane golf swing will be pushes, hooks, fats, thins, and the dreaded golf shank because of the general shallowness of the swing.

If you recognize these traits, then you are a perfect candidate to become a one plane golfer. A one plane swing is such a smooth golf swing. It will take some work to learn the proper mechanics of a golf swing, but once you master the technique, the maintenance of the swing is low.

Two Plane Golf Swing Overview

Here is a swing breakdown for the two plane swing. The two plane swing is the complete opposite. You will stand more upright, closer to the ball, and have a more upright club shaft. In the back swing, the two planer will swing the club more up and over the shoulder instead of around. In the downswing, the two planer will have their left arm pointed towards the ball pulling down at the ball.  The two plane golf swing is a horizontal turning of the body combined with the vertical lifting and chopping motion of the arms. When the player hits the ball, the right arm and sometimes the hips will go out more towards the target line in the golf swing follow through. The finish will be higher and upright.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credit: Plane Truth Golf

Two plane golfers are more likely to hit the pulls, slices, and chunks when their swing gets out of whack because of their steeper angle of attack. Two planers also tend to be better with fairway woods and long irons versus their wedges. You must shape your shots to be a great two planer. Hitting the ball straight will be a challenge with a two plane swing. Just ask Phil Mickelson.

If you recognize these traits then you are a perfect candidate to become a two plane golfer. I believe the two plane golf swing is power golf swing best suited for younger golfers because it requires more power and leverage to hit the ball further. The two plane golf swing is the more simple golf swing to learn of the two swing types. You can learn a two plane swing in a day but it requires much more timing, tempo, rhythm, balance and a lot of maintenance to keep your swing at a high level.

With that being said, I have also found that the more athletic and flexible you are, the more you are suited to the one plane swing. At the same time the less athletic golfer is often times better suited to the two plane swing. I believe the two plane golf swing is the best golf swing for seniors because it requires less mechanics to learn to play good golf.

The one plane swing is not an easy golf swing for seniors to learn generally speaking. A one plane swing is not typically the easiest swing in golf to learn for anyone as a matter of fact. The two plane golf swing is the more simple golf swing for seniors to learn, but you need to be careful not to injure your hips or lower back with too much thrusting.

How do you know which one to choose?

Here is a simple test by Jim Hardy himself.

 

If are already shooting in the 90’s or higher and looking for golf swing help, you can get better rather quickly if you apply the characteristics of either the one plane or two plane technique in your swing. The one and two plane methods are great golf swings for beginners on up to tour pros. You don’t need a pro golf swing to play great golf with either one.

Let me say this. No matter which one you choose, you can play excellent golf. One is not better than the other. Can you still play excellent golf if you pick the “wrong” style? Absolutely. The one plane and two plane swings are good golf swings and both are powerful golf swings.  A good golf swing is the one that works best with your natural abilities. Find the one that feels the best and run with it.

One and Two Plane Golf Swing Basics

Time for the meat and potatoes. Let’s go over the swing fundamentals of how to get the golf swing setup to make a correct one or two plane golf swing. We will cover the golf swing basics with videos and written explanations. The address, stance, posture, grip and ball position of the one and two plane golf swings will be discussed in great detail. Let’s first discuss how to actually hit the ball we are swing at.

How to Hit a Golf Ball

Have you heard of compressing a golf ball? You compress the ball when you hit a shot with your irons. When you hit the ball with your golf iron swing on a descending angle, hitting the ball first, you compress and put backspin on the ball. The back spin created with the downward blow makes the ball go up in the air. Compressing the ball is that pure crisp solid feeling when you hit a really good shot. That hiss of the ball and the explosion of the ball off the face is down right addictive. To compress the ball properly, the bottom of the swing plane or arc must be ahead of the ball. We will talk more about the swing plane in my other articles in this series.

What happens when you don’t compress the ball? You hit the ball fat or thin.

When you hit the ball fat, the divot starts behind the ball. When you hit it thin, the club hits too high on the ball and there will be little or no divot. When you make solid contact with the ball, you get a ball then divot contact and compression. Swing plane issues are the issue when you are hitting fat and thin. The bottom of the swing is too steep or too shallow.

When are compressing the ball right, it feels as if you are pinching the ball between the club face and the ground.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credits to Scott Yurgalevicz 

You may hear this from other instructors but hitting down will not increase your compression of the golf ball or the spin on the shot. PLEASE DO NOT HIT DOWN ON THE BALL! I actually thought I had broken my right wrist after hearing from a un-named “famous” golf instructor that I had to hit down on the ball as hard as I could to compress the ball. After not hitting a ball for the next month, I ended up making my swing so shallow (so I didn’t hurt my wrist again) that I didn’t take any divots for nearly 2 months after that session at the range.

How to Drive a Golf Ball

The driver swing plane is the same as your iron swing, but the club is just longer. The driver sweeps the ball off the tee and doesn’t use the ground to compress the ball into the air with backspin. The driver requires you to hit the ball slightly on the upswing to get it into the air. You don’t compress the ball with your driver as much as you deform the ball during the golf swing impact.  To accomplish this, you need to move the ball up further in your golf swing stance to accommodate the bottom of your swing arc and catch it on the upswing. Typically, the left instep of the heel is a general location for most golfers to place the ball for a proper driver swing to hit the ball either at the bottom of the swing arc or on a slight upswing.

One Plane Golf Swing Basics

Before you learn how to properly swing a golf club, you have to know where to stand and how to grip the club. Jack Nicklaus said in his book “Golf My Way” “If you set up correctly, there’s a good chance you’ll hit a reasonable shot, even if you make a mediocre swing. If you set up to the ball poorly, you’ll hit a lousy shot even if you make the greatest swing in the world.”

Let’s get started with the grip.

One Plane Golf Grip

Start by checking out the in depth article I personally wrote on the grip called “The Golf Grip: How to Grip a Golf Club (HOW TO HOLD A GOLF CLUB FOR YOUR SWING TYPE)”. Follow the instructions and get the proper grip for the one plane swing type.

One Plane Golf Stance

For a one plane golf swing, you should make a stance that is a little wider than you would normally take.  For example, with a driver the distance between the insides of your feet should be roughly as wide as the outside of your shoulders. A wide stance gives you a solid foundation that you need to support the rotation of your core and to support the wider and flat swing plane that is the one plane swing. Hogan said with longer clubs your feet get progressively wider, and for shorter clubs than that your feet get progressively closer together.

The feet should be roughly shoulder width for 4 thru 6 irons then marginally wider for each longer club until the driver, which I want to be about 2 inches wider than shoulder width. When talking about a full pitching wedge the insides of your feet should still be about a foot apart. All of your full shots should remain relatively wide. Hogan teaches to have a slightly closed stance for driver and long irons (Driver – 3 iron/hybrid), a square stance for mid irons (4 – 6 irons), and then a slightly open stance for short irons (7 iron to sand wedge) for full shots. I would err on the side of having a stance that is slightly closed if anything.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credit: “Five Lessons: Modern Fundamentals of Golf” Book by Ben Hogan

One Plane Posture

You should bend forward so that your spine is somewhere between 30 to 45 degrees down from standing upright. You will know that you are bent forward enough when your arms hang so that your hands are straight below your chin. There should be no reaching toward the ball. From a face on angle, your spine should have no side ways bend or tilt. You want to be perfectly straight. Your hands should be just a touch ahead of the center of your body. Think of your hands being just to the left of your zipper if you were looking straight down. Depending on the club you are hitting, your hands will be approximately even with, slightly behind, or slightly ahead of the ball.

Here is a great video by Krista Dunton from TheVillageGolf about the how to set up your stance and the posture of the one plane golf swing.

One Plane Golf Ball Position

You need to position the ball correctly in relation to the feet, and how far away it needs to be from the feet. You should stand slightly farther away from the ball. Your arms and the club will be a bit farther away from your body because you are bent over. The length of the club will determine the overall distance that you stand from the ball.

The driver ball position should rest on a straight line drawn to the instep of your left heel or an inch towards the middle. Play with this to see what works best for you. This will let you make contact ever so slightly on the upswing. This is exactly what we are looking for with a driver. For the rest of the clubs the ball position should be about 1 inch inside the left heel. You will only move the right foot back in your stance very gradually as the clubs get longer like Ben Hogan did. The ball will stay in virtually the same position at the instep of the left heel or an inch towards the middle.

Here is a great video of golf swing ball positioning video by Clay Ballard. Clay talks about how Ben Hogan positioned his feet in his classic book “Five Lessons: Modern Fundamentals of Golf”. (Ignore the “lag preview” at the end. More about the pitfalls of creating more lag in a later article).

Two Plane Golf Swing Basics

Now that we have covered the one plane swing, let’s go over the swing mechanics of how to make a two plane golf swing. We will cover the address, stance, posture, grip and ball position of the two plane golf swing. Let’s start with the grip.

Two Plane Golf Grip

Start by checking out the in depth article I personally wrote on the grip called “The Golf Grip: How to Grip a Golf Club (HOW TO HOLD A GOLF CLUB FOR YOUR SWING TYPE)“.

Two Plane Golf Stance

The two plane golfer should have a narrower stance. Not a ton narrower, but just enough to be noticeable. With the driver, I like to see the insides of your feet be a little narrower than your shoulders, say about hip width apart. Just like the one planer, you work your way down through your golf bag narrowing your stance a little bit with every club. When you get to a full pitching wedge, the distance between the feet should be no closer than 10 inches apart. The reason we narrow the stance is to keep the lower body out of the swing and in more of a supporting role to the arms. The arms are the dominant power of the two plane swing.

The two plane golfer should keep your left toe basically on the target line. Keeping the left foot square will allow your hips to turn as fully as possible on the back swing. This gives the two plane swing some width in their golf swing that is really needed. The two plane player’s weight should slightly favor the right foot.  Having your weight favoring the rear foot will help you add more width to the two plane back swing. The narrowness of the two plane golf swing needs as much width as possible for most golfers.

The two plane golfer should focus on being square in the alignment of all of the body parts. The the feet, hips, and shoulders should be parallel toward your target. This will be true for all full shots.

Two Plane Posture

The two plane golfer should bend forward from the hips only 10 to 20 degrees from upright. No more bend is needed. Your posture should be more upright than a one planer. The key in the two plane posture is making sure your shoulders and hips are situated to turn along the same shallow swing plane. Similar to a merry go round. Keep your arms relatively relaxed and hanging in front of you at address. Do not reach for the ball.

Your arms will be closer in to your body since you are not bent over as much. The hands should still basically sit underneath your chin. The term used for a correct two plane address position is called the “Reverse K.” To get into the Reverse K position, the two-plane golfer should slightly tilt the spine and upper body to the right and away from the target at address. Your right shoulder will be slightly lower than your left when viewed from the face on angle. This slight spine tilt will position more of your weight on the rear foot. This will give a wider swing plane you need as a two planer.

Here is a great set up video by Martin Hall from the Golf Channel about the Reverse K set up for the two plane stance and posture.

The two planer should address the ball with the hands slightly ahead of the club head. The major difference is that the two planer will stand a shorter distance from the ball. You have bent your spine forward much less than the one plane player and your hands are still a line drawn down from underneath your chin. The hands should be over the left seam of the pant leg. From a face on angle, the club shaft should seem to be an extension of your left arm. You could draw a straight line running all the way from your left shoulder down to the club head itself. In the reverse K golf setup position you will get the feeling of being more under and behind the ball. Might be a little strange for you at first, but you will get used to it.

Two Plane Golf Ball Position

You need to position the ball correctly in relation to the feet, and how far close they need to be from the feet. You should stand slightly closer to the ball. The ball position in relation to your feet is the complete opposite as that for the one plane golfer. You will move the ball back instead of the right foot. The only similarity is the ball position of the driver. The left heel instep is where you will position the ball for driver and then a gradual working back towards the center of the stance for a full pitching wedge. I would move the ball back about the length of a ball (no more than 2 inches per every three clubs). Play around with this and see what works best for the bottom of your swing plane.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credit: golf-info-guide.com

Here is a great ball positioning video by Rick Shiels Golf . I recommend variable ball positioning over the single ball position for the two plane golf swing.

The Golf Swing Mechanics

One Plane Golf Swing Mechanics

The one plane golf swing is flat and shallow by nature so you need certain swing mechanics and fundamentals for this swing type. Learning a one plane swing typically takes a great deal of work to learn the proper golf mechanics. Golf Swing timing is not all that important in the one plane swing so once you master the techniques, the maintenance of the swing is pretty low.

In the one plane swing, we are typically looking for moves that have a steepening effect on the swing. This helps to balance the natural flatness of the one plane swing.

There are a few keys I would like to point out in regards to the one plane swing. 

  • A wide stance in the one plane swing is required and helps your balance.
  • Stay bent over at address. The more bent posture allows the shoulders to turn steeper, which balances the flatness of the arms in the swing.
  • Your spine angle will stay relatively bent over from address until just after impact.
  • In the back swing is that you must make a complete shoulder turn. If you have the flexibility, your shoulders should turn as much as you can comfortably.
  • Standing up or aggressively transferring weight is not for a one plane golf swing.
  • You never want to feel like you are pulling with your left arm.
  • Your golf swing thoughts should be about swinging the club around your body. The arms and hands are basically throwing the club around the body in a circle.
  • Your main golf downswing thought should be turning your body as hard as you swing the golf club around you.
  • You will make a powerful and complete lower body turn on to the left leg. There is absolutely no slide in your hips toward the target. The hip turn clears the way for his downswing and for the follow through.
  • In-to-in is the swing path you are looking for with the one plane swing.

I had plans to write in great detail all of the details of the one plane swing for you here. However, the golf swing video’s below are fantastic and give the fine details of the mechanics as good as I could or maybe even better.

Here is a proper golf swing video from Golf Zone TV about one plane golf swing mechanics step by step and how to swing a golf club with the one plane golf swing.

One Plane Back swing Mechanics

Again, I was going write a lot of detail on the one plane golf swing takeaway and a proper golf backswing, but a colleague of mine Josh Zander made such a fantastic video on the one plane back swing mechanics. Press play and soak it in.

One Plane Downswing Mechanics

Here is Josh Zander again with another fantastic video on the one plane downswing so just press play and soak it in.

Two Plane Golf Swing Mechanics

The two plane golf swing is narrow and steep by nature so you need certain mechanics and fundamentals for this swing type. Learning a one plane swing typically takes a few hours to learn the proper mechanics, but the maintenance to keep the timing/tempo/rhythm/balance are continuously ongoing processes. 

There are a few keys I would like to point out in regards to the two plane swing.

  • The narrower stance helps the body to move more off the ball.
  • Your posture should be more upright. The more upright posture allows the shoulders to turn flatter, and balances the vertical arm swing action.
  • Your spine angle will stay upright and will like rise by impact.
  • Relax your arms and hanging in front of you at address. Do not reach for the ball.
  • Standing up or aggressively transferring weight creates body width which is perfect for this swing type. You need to transfer your weight pretty aggressively in the back swing to generate club head speed and balance the narrowness of the upright arm swing.
  • You will want to turn your hips and shoulders as fully as possible in your back swing.
  • Your golf swing thoughts should be about pulling the club down from the top with your arms in the downswing.
  • You will square the club face with rotation of the forearms and an outward motion.
  • Please try not to swing your arms as fast as you can. Golf tempo, timing rhythm, and balance are the keys for this type of swing.
  • In-to-out is the swing path you are looking for with the two plane swing.

Here is another proper golf swing video from Golf Zone TV about two plane golf swing mechanics step by step and how to swing the golf club with the two plane golf swing.

Two Plane Back Swing Mechanics

Unfortunately there are not many video’s that talk about the two plane back swing so I will have to piece it together. The body motor and arms move in separate planes (horizontal for body and vertical for arms) so you have to talk about them separately. Here is a video by RichLKinder that gives a good overview of what a proper golf backswing looks like for a two plane golfer.

Two Plane Body Movement – Back Swing Mechanics

The only element of the two plane back swing that is identical to that of the one plane swing is the shoulder turn. In both swings, you turn your shoulders as fully as you can. 90 degrees or more if you are able to. The two plane back swing is completely different because you also turn your hips as fully as you can as well. Your shoulders and your hips should turn on almost the identical plane during the back swing. Do not try to restrict your hip turn at all. Turn the hips as much as you want, as long as the hips stay centered over your feet you are good to go.

As you swing back, you should feel your weight moving onto your right or rear foot. You want to feel as if are getting your upper body more behind the ball. As you reach the top of the two plane back swing, both your hips and your shoulders will have turned well away from the ball. Your weight should be on your right foot. The two planer will also usually reach the top with his or her left heel turned inward or with the left heel completely off the ground like Bubba Watson below or Jack Nicklaus.

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credits: Golf Tips Mag

This is a tremendous video to show the proper Shoulder Turn and Hip turn for a two plane golfer with JamesParkerGolf.

In summary, at the top of the two plane back swing you should feel as if you are more turned behind the ball with the upper body, as opposed to directly over it.

Two Plane Arm Movement – Back Swing Mechanics

In the two plane swing, you are basically keeping your arms in front of your upper body. While your shoulders and hips turn, you will swing your arms straight up during the back swing and then pulling down on the down swing. The best way to visualize the two plane swing is to think of turning your body while you karate chop your arms both up and down. The two plane swing is a combination of a nearly horizontal body turn with a nearly vertical movement of the arms.

Here is a great example of what the arms are doing in the two plane golf swing by Steven Bann:

In the ideal two-plane back swing, the arm swing and the shoulder turn will be a smooth and synchronous movement. The two plane golfer will typically see the club shaft either parallel to the target line or be crossing the line slightly at the top like Jack Nicklaus here below.

Golf Swing Machanics

Photo Credits: Anti-method Golf

Golf Swing Mechanics

Photo Credits: Golf Digest

Two Plane Body Movement – Down Swing Mechanics

The first move from the top in a two plane swing is a lateral shift of the left hip toward the target. After the shift, you should keep turning your hips counter-clockwise through impact and follow through. Here Andy Proudman from Meandmygolf.com beautifully displays the role of the hips in a two plane golf swing.

The shoulders will follow the turning lead of the hips. In a correct two plane downswing, try to turn your hips and shoulders a full 180 degrees from the top of the back swing through the completion of the follow through.

Two Plane Arm Movement – Down Swing Mechanics

In the two plane downswing, you must have a strong downward lever pulling force with your arms. Pull the club down from the top with your left arm as hard as you can towards the ball. Do not pull the arms straight down. I love the video below by Kerrod Gray from Kerrod Gray Golf.  He speaks about pulling the left arm towards the golf ball which is a great swing thought for the arms in a two plane golf swing.

In the previous section, we talked about starting the downswing by sliding the hips laterally toward your target. You need to coordinate this lateral hip slide with the pull of of your left hand and arm straight down at the golf ball. Your shoulders and hips will turn through the downswing at the same pace as the arms continue to swing the club vertically downward. Remember that you must be aggressive with this downward pull move. When you are pulling with your arms, the turning of your shoulders will naturally bring your arms outward toward and through the impact of the ball.

Timing, tempo, rhythm, and balance are the keys that are going to work the best for the two plane type of swing.

Conclusion

Find the model that fits your natural strengths best and then work on the things that make your swing type better. Think of the basic one plane and two plane swings as simple golf swing models with a whole bunch of variation between the two models.  I would like you to copy the basic elements of either the one plane or two plane swing listed above. Golf swing problems usually start when you mix elements of the one plane and two plane swing. If you can successfully copy the elements of just one type of swing you are going to be a pretty darn good golfer.  

Lets recap the golf swing basics and mechanics:

  • Find the model that fits your strengths best and then work only on the things that make your swing type better (either one or two plane not both).
  • Make sure you have a neural grip and you are set up correctly for your swing type (either one or two plane not both).
  • Learning a one plane swing typically takes a great deal of work to learn the proper mechanics. Timing is not involved in the one plane swing so once you master the techniques, the maintenance of the swing is pretty low.
  • Learning a one plane swing typically takes a few hours to learn the proper mechanics, but the maintenance to keep the timing/tempo/rhythm/balance are continuously ongoing processes. 

Looking for in person golf instruction? Check out the directory of  Jim Hardy’s Certified Instructors. The network of instructors spans over a dozen countries all over the world. Use the link below to find the nearest Plane Truth Certified Instructor in your area.

PLANE TRUTH CERTIFIED INSTRUCTOR DIRECTORY

References

Yurgalevicz, Scott. “Hitting Down To Take a Divot? Read this first”, golfwrx.com

Bowden, Ken and Nicklaus, Jack. (1974) “Golf My Way”. Simon and Schuster. p. 77

‎Andrisani, John and Hardy, Jim. (2005).“The Plane Truth for Golfers: The Plane Truth for Golfers: Breaking Down the One-Plane Swing and the Two-Plane Swing and Finding the One That’s Right for You”. McGraw-Hill. p. 11 – 28.

Hogan, Ben and Wind Warren, Herbert. (1985). Five Lessons: Modern Fundamentals of Golf. Simon and Schuster. p. 124 – 128.

Further Reading

The Path to Straighter Shots – Mike LaBauve

Impact Location by Handicap – Tom Stickney II

Jim Hardy Explains How to Work on Swing Plane

Golf Fix: Jim Hardy talks one-plane swing

Jim Hardy’s Book “Solid Contact: A Top Instructor’s Guide to Learning Your Swing DNA and Instantly Striking the B all Better Than Ever

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